Doctoral

Doctoral Accomplishments

Recent Graduates

Lin (Libby) Yi: Accounting
Dissertation Co-chairs: Gerald Lobo and Emre Kilic
Dissertation Title: Do Bank Managers Strategically Exploit Their Moral Wiggle Room in Providing for Loan Losses on Seller’s Interests of Securitized Loans

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Extant literature on the use of securitization as an earnings management tool focuses solely on the one-off use of securitization gains/losses to manage earnings at the inceptions of securitization transactions. In contrast, I conjecture that securitizations provide managers with greater moral wiggle room to manage earnings on a continuous basis via loan loss provisions (LLP) on retained sellers’ interest of securitized loans (SIL) because managers possess relatively less information about securitized loans vis-à-vis regular loans. Consistent with this conjecture, I find that bank managers’ use of LLP for income smoothing is greater when the bank holds SIL and is increasing on the relative size of SIL to total loan portfolio. Further tests reveal that incremental use of SIL’s LLP for income smoothing is lower for highly reputed banks and for public banks where external capital market scrutiny is greater. I find some evidence to suggest that managers with income increasing incentives find SIL to be even more useful in the fiscal fourth quarter where greater auditor scrutiny makes it more difficult to manage earnings via LLP of regular loans.
Placement: University of Houston, Clear Lake

Jeff Boichuk (2015): Marketing
Dissertation Chair: Michael Ahearne
Dissertation Title: Developing and Retaining New Hires During the Sales Force Socialization Process

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    This dissertation shines light on the sales force socialization process, wherein companies aim to develop and retain new hires. In the first essay, we draw from learned helplessness theory to understand why cumulative periods of sales performance failure enhance new hires’ intentions to engage in sales-oriented behaviors. Based on panel survey data from 221 new hires of a furniture retailer, findings suggest that core transformational leadership thwarts this process, but also that its effect diminishes as instances of unmet sales goals accumulate. A subsequent lab experiment identifies perceived task difficulty as the mechanism through which sales performance failure translates into sales-oriented behavior intentions and finds support for error management as a better way to curb helplessness and develop new hires. In the second essay, we study the influence of social effects on sales force turnover, using a multi-source, longitudinal dataset from a national household durables retailer of 3,832 sales agents. The results advance social information processing theory and again propose that core transformational leadership plays an important role during early tenure stages; the analyses show that this management style reduced new hires’ risk of turnover, but at a diminishing rate. On the other hand, the influence of peers tended to increase over time, with the demographic diversity of new hires’ sales districts increasing their risk of turnover during later tenure stages and observations of peers quitting having a similar effect. Taken together, these essays provide insights that companies can incorporate into their sales force socialization processes to develop and retain new hires.
Placement: University of Virginia

Ying Yang (2014): Marketing
Dissertation Chair: James Hess
Dissertation Title: Unfairness in Sales Teams: A Behavioral Exploration

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Unfairness in sales force compensation is a very challenging problem in global sales organizations. Sales executives find a growing number of complaints of unfair compensation from field salespeople. While some salespeople think it is alright to get same compensation plan as someone less competent, others might think it is totally unfair to them. When salespeople perceive they are not compensated fairly, they become less motivated, get slack, destroy morale, kill teamwork, or even worse, quit. How do feelings of unfairness about the compensation system affect salespeople’s decisions and firm’s profit? I endeavor to solve this challenging managerial problem of unfairness in the team-based compensation. I first built up a principle-agent model for a sales team of two salespeople, who have different roles and responsibilities and different preferences for inequity. I then use laboratory experiments to test the theory predictions and estimate inequity aversion of salespeople in a sales team.

    In particular, Essay 1 builds an analytical model of sales team to tackle the managerial problem of motivating team-selling salespeople effectively when team-based rewards engender a sense of unfairness. By introducing inequity aversion into standard principal-agent analytic models of sales team, I have obtained the equilibrium effort decisions for both the manager and the salesperson in a sales team. When the sales manager has to do both selling and coaching and the salesperson only has to sell, their effort decisions depend on not only their own commission rates but also their team member’s. In addition, their inequity aversion with respect to commission rate difference will reduce their effort levels and firm’s profit. If the firm realizes the inequity aversion of these salespeople, equal commission rates will be offered to mitigate the impacts of inequity aversion. Surprisingly, I found that, in some circumstance, the more inequity averse the sales manager is, the more help is he willing to give to the salesperson who is earning higher commission rate than him. However, this surprising result vanishes with homogeneous commission rates.

    Essay 2 tests whether the manager and the salesperson conforms to the theory in their effort decisions in a laboratory experiment. I conducted 2x2 between-subject experiments with two levels of commission rates and salaries for the manager while those of the salesperson are held as constant. By manipulating inequity, I am able to empirically estimate both disadvantageous inequity aversion, envy, by the manager and advantageous inequity aversion, guilt, by the salesperson. I have found the manager has envy for commission rate but not so much for the salary. In comparison, the salesperson does not feel guilty regarding to their higher commission rates and/or higher salaries. Although they do not share a common belief in each other’s inequity aversion, their decisions of efforts and switching to another pay reflects their preferences to other person’s commission rate but not salary.
Placement: University of Iowa

Weixing Ford (2014): Marketing
Dissertation Chair: Partha Krishnamurthy
Dissertation Title: Cross Category Referencing Effects on Consumer Judgment and Decision-Making

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    This research explores whether the salience of value for money information of a different and unrelated product category influences the decision-making in the focal category. I examine whether value for money contrast and numerical price information of the cross category referent may influence decision-making in the focal category. Specifically, I explore whether a referent from an inferior value for money category makes the focal product category appear more desirable, and increase willingness to pay in the focal category. In four studies, I find broad support for the proposition that under certain conditions, cross-category referents may influence decision-making in a focal category. Specifically I find that (a) inferior value for money referents influence willingness-to-pay, but not choice of premium over standard product; and (b) this effect is attenuated when the referent is inconsistent with its value for money contrast at the category versus option level, and when the focal task is perceived as being more difficult.
Placement: Texas A&M University - San Antonio

Sina Damangir (2014): Marketing
Dissertation Chair: Rex Du & Ye Hu
Dissertation Title: Leveraging Online Tracking Data in Market Response Modeling

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    This dissertation develops techniques that use the information from online tracking data for analyzing market response. In theory, the observed market response originates from latent characteristics of the market such as consumers’ preference for products and features, consumer considerations, and the underlying competitive landscape. Understanding these latent characteristics is essential in making high quality marketing decisions. However, finding a reliable and inexpensive proxy for them is a challenge. We explore the possibility of using insights from big data sources to better identify these latent characteristics. We apply our techniques to analyze the market for automobiles in the U.S.

    In Essay 1, we explore the potential of using trends in online searches for feature-related keywords as proxies for trends in the relative importance consumers place on the corresponding features. The relative importance consumers place on features may vary over time due to factors beyond the control of marketers (e.g., shifts in economic conditions, advances in technology). We make the baseline attractiveness of 70 top-selling automobiles a function of Google Trends indexes for five common features: fuel efficiency, acceleration, body type, cost to buy, and cost to operate. We find strong empirical evidence supporting the notion that the evolution of feature search intensity contains genuine information about shifting consumers’ tastes.

    In essay 2, we propose a market share model that (1) identifies the position of products on a latent perceptual map, (2) identify consumer segments, and (3) estimates the latent ideal points for each segment. We identify the product positions using a novel big data approach in measuring competition between the products. Using a sample of 23 automobiles in sedan sector, we show that our proposed approach performs better than alternative approaches in identifying latent product positions.
Placement: San Francisco State University

Ksenia Krylova: Management
Dissertation Chair: Teri Elkins Longacre
Dissertation Title: Dispositional Attributions and Deterioration of Trust Following Transgression: The Role of Perceived Intent and Outcome Severity

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Research to date has shown that trust and trustworthiness are among the most damaged positive states of a relationship when transgressions occur (Robinson, 1996; Sitkin & Roth, 1993). Across studies, scholars from different disciplines have relied largely on an investigator-imposed distinction between transgressions stemming from a lack of integrity or a lack of competence to understand how and when trust can be restored. While not suggesting that this distinction between integrity and competence transgressions is either unimportant or artificial, the proposed research will address a fundamental precursor to victims’ reactions to the differences between them. The dissertation will attempt to understand how an offended party’s underlying causal attributions about a transgressor’s integrity and competence are formed. To address this issue, the study will attempt to answer the basic question of whether there other more natural distinctions between transgressions that determine its consequences for trust. More specifically, the dissertation posits that two key variables (perceived intent and outcome severity) substantially determine whether a particular transgression is attributed to a transgressor’s integrity or to competence. And, subsequently, these two variables will provide supplemental predictive power for understanding post-transgression levels of trust.

    Hypotheses were tested using a 3x2 factorial design which manipulated intent and outcome severity (mild, moderate, severe). Results of analysis of variance indicated that intent had an overwhelming effect on perceived integrity and trust. Unexpectedly, it had an effect on perceived competence as well; however, the results of the analyses of effect size unambiguously showed that the influence on perceptions of integrity was dramatically stronger than the influence on perceptions of ability. Outcome severity did not have any significant effect on the outcomes, nor did it moderate the relationship between intent and trust.
Placement: NEOMA Business School, France

Mengge Li: Management
Dissertation Chair: Laura B. Cardinal
Dissertation Title: Towards an Attention-based Model of CEO and Innovation

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    CEOs are primarily responsible for managing technological innovation as the key source of competitive advantage for science-based and technological intensive industries. Thus, studying the effects of CEOs on innovation is an important stream of research in strategic management. However, research on this topic has not reached consistent conclusions because of both theoretical and empirical limitations. To address the limitations and advance knowledge, this research builds an attention-based model that integrates the upper echelons perspective and the attention-based view of the firm to explain and predict how CEOs influence technological innovation through their attentional perspective. This model conceptualizes a CEO’s attention as a multidimensional construct that has three independent dimensions – attention breadth, attention focus, and attention heterogeneity. Further, to capture the complexity of technological innovation, this model includes three distinct dimensions – innovation productivity, innovation approach, and innovation quality. This attention-based model offers three unique advancements. First, this model probes into the substance of information-processing by examining a CEO’s attention, which is one of the most crucial cognitive mechanisms. Second, this model explicates the mechanism and process that underlie relationships between CEO demographic characteristics and technological innovation. Finally, this model presents a holistic yet parsimonious conceptual framework that guides future research by theorizing the causality between the three dimensions of managerial attention and the three dimensions of technological innovation.
Placement: The University of Texas at El Paso

Zahir Latheef: Management
Dissertation Chair: Richard S. DeFrank
Dissertation Title: Volunteering as a Source of Conflict or Enrichment for Work: The Role of Employer Support

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    While numerous studies have explored the relationship between work and family, few have examined the connection between work and community, leaving a gap in our understanding of the work-nonwork relationship. Drawing from ecological systems theory and conservation of resources theory, this study proposes volunteering as a domain that conflicts with and/or enriches the workplace. Using a sample of 95 employed individuals who volunteer with nonprofit organizations, this paper investigated the role of employer support of volunteering (ESV), suggesting ESV impacts key work outcomes (performance, withdrawal, satisfaction) through the mediating roles of volunteer-work conflict and volunteer-work enrichment (similar to family-work conflict and enrichment). The results suggest employer support of volunteering consists of distinct sources of support including the organization, supervisor, and co-worker, with each source having unique relationships with work outcomes. Support of volunteering has a direct effect on work outcomes, specifically turnover intent, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction. Volunteer-work conflict was linked to increased work withdrawal and emotional exhaustion, as well as lower performance and satisfaction. Volunteer-work enrichment was linked to higher task and contextual performance, and enrichment is likely to affect contextual performance (e.g., putting in extra hours, supporting co-workers) more than task performance. Lastly, the relationship between supervisor support of volunteering and enrichment was moderated by volunteer engagement, with support affecting those who are not highly engaged in their volunteering while having almost no effect on those highly engaged. In sum, the study substantiates the notion that volunteering is a domain that interacts with the work domain and support of volunteering has important consequences for employees.
Placement: University of Houston - Downtown

Tiffany Maldonado: Management
Dissertation Chair: Dusya Vera
Dissertation Title: The Individual and Combined Effects of CEO Humility, CEO Narcissism, and CEO Competence on Firm Performance

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    While humility as a characteristic of top managers has attracted increasing attention in recent years, there are still many misconceptions about what humility actually is, and about how a humble CEO could benefit or harm a firm’s performance. In contrast to the case of humility, the leadership traits of narcissism and competence are often emphasized as desirable. This study challenged the view of humility as associated with shyness or lack of self-esteem, and, in contrast, positioned it as a critical strength for strategic leaders possessing it, and a dangerous weakness for those lacking it. Humility was conceptualized as having five dimensions: accurate self-awareness, appreciation of others, teachability, low self-focus, and self-transcendent pursuits.

    The primary purpose of the study was to examine the impact of CEO humility on firm performance. Furthermore, I argued that humility can not only coexist with CEO competence, and with some degree of CEO grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, and, but that the most benefit for companies occurs when the CEO embodies combinations of these characteristics. To test my model, I developed and validated a new unobtrusive measure of CEO humility, through two pilot studies, and used a sample of 102 male CEOs to test my hypotheses. The findings showed partial support for the positive effects of CEO humility on firm performance, and partial support for the positive moderating effect of CEO humility on the relationship between CEO grandiose narcissism and performance performances. Post-hoc analyses explored the dimensionality of the humility and competence variables, and examined the relationships included in my model by using individual items and dimensions of these two constructs.
Placement: None Yet

Pooya Tabesh: Management
Dissertation Chair: Dusya Vera
Dissertation Title: The Impact of Slack Resources on Exploration and Exploitation: An Upper Echelons and Behavioral Theory of the Firm Perspective

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Slack resources can be critical for organizational success, but cumulative research regarding the relationship between slack and organizational outcomes (e.g., firm performance and innovation) has resulted in mixed findings. Using the behavioral theory of the firm, I untangled the effect of slack by differentiating between the impacts of unabsorbed, absorbed, and potential slack and investigating their effects on exploratory and exploitative activities in organizations. More importantly, I introduced an upper echelons perspective in order to highlight the critical role of CEO tenure, functional background type, functional background breadth, and technical education in unabsorbed slack deployment. This is one of the first such efforts in the organizational literature. The findings, based on panel data from the computer software industry, confirm differential effects of unabsorbed and potential slack on exploration and exploitation. Results also indicate that firms lead by CEOs with wider breadth of functional background and with technical education tend to use more unabsorbed slack resources towards exploitative activities.
Placement: St. Thomas University

Klavdia Markelva Ballard: Management
Dissertation Chair: Dusya Vera
Dissertation Title: Directors’ Professional Devaluation from Firm Bankruptcy: An Integrated Model of the Effects of Stigma, Devaluated Competence, and Gained Experience

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Building on signaling theory and the literature on judgment under uncertainties, we examine the effects of Chapter 11 bankruptcy on directors’ professional future. We ask if the professional devaluation of directors--in terms of number of board appointments, quality of board appointments, and compensation from board appointments-- takes place due to the stigma of incompetence or due to courtesy stigma resulting from a firm’s bankruptcy. Moreover, we investigate if corporate failure unavoidably leads to professional devaluation or, if in some cases, the executive labor market actually rewards the experience of bankruptcy. We differentiate among directors associated with (1) the origin of the bankruptcy, (2) its filing, and (3) the actual reorganization of the bankruptcy. We associate bankruptcy origination with stigma of incompetence, and bankruptcy filing with courtesy stigma. In addition, we argue that monitoring a company through bankruptcy reorganization is a value-increasing experience and will be rewarded by the executive labor market, particularly in the cases of the reorganizations of highly complex bankruptcies, and in the cases in which the companies show progress in the recovery process. Finally, our model considers the possibility of overlaps in the involvement of directors in more than one stage of Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and their consequences in the executive labor market.
Placement: St. Mary's University

Kyoung Yong Kim: Management
Dissertation Chair: Leanne Atwater
Dissertation Title: CEO Implicit Person Theory: Its Effect on Firm Performance via HR Practices and Leadership Behavior

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Implicit person theory (IPT) is concerned with the assumptions that individuals have about the malleability of personal attributes such as ability, intelligence, and personality. A growth mindset assumes that such personal attributes are relatively malleable and thus able to change over time. On the contrary, a fixed mindset reflects the assumption that personal attributes are largely fixed and tend not to change much over time. As IPT can influence employees in organizations, during the last decade a number of studies have examined IPT in organizational settings, with the most focus on managers’ IPT. However, in organizations the IPT held by chief executive officers (CEOs) may be of paramount importance theoretically and practically given that the CEO is the one who leads the entire organization. No study has yet examined how CEOs’ IPT influences organizations and what the consequences are. Thus, in this study, I examine how CEOs’ IPT influences organizational financial performance by proposing structural and behavioral mechanisms: (1) high performance work systems (HPWS) and (2) transformational leadership. Specifically, I propose that CEOs with a growth mindset are more likely than those with a fixed mindset to implement HPWS and engage in transformational behaviors, which in turn positively contribute to organizational financial performance. I also propose that CEOs’ perceived change in workforce productivity moderates the relationship between CEOs’ IPT and utilizing HPWS and transformational leadership, such that CEOs with a growth mindset are more likely to utilize HPWS and transformational leadership when they perceive a decrease in workforce productivity than when they perceive an increase.
Placement: City University of Hong Kong

Rob Austin McKee: Management
Dissertation Chair: Leanne Atwater
Dissertation Title: Hunger, Satiety, and Decision Making: A Review, Replication and Extension

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    This study builds upon a small but growing literature examining topics such as motivation, decision making, and behavior in light of visceral physiological states such as hunger, thirst, sexual desire, and cravings related to addiction. Such seemingly extraneous factors have been shown to affect even expert decision makers in highly consequential realms. Illuminated by diverse fields such as neuroscience, physiology, gastroenterology, gastronomy, nutrition, and economics, the present study forges a path forward into the realm of organizational behavior, exploring the role of visceral states, specifically hunger and satiety, in various contexts, including temporal discounting, risk propensity, and (un)ethicality. Through this integration of broad research streams, I aspire to achieve some degree of consilience within the literature and to help broaden the scope of organizational behavior by considering robust findings from nontraditionally-related fields.

    In order to accomplish this, a research study is proposed wherein participants, having fasted overnight, arrive at the experimental setting and are each randomly assigned to either a hunger or a satiety condition. The experimental manipulation involves tasting a variety of foods in order to obscure the otherwise potentially obvious intent of the study from participants. In this way, the study embodies the spirit, if not the precise form, of randomized, blinded, clinical trial. After the experimental manipulations, participants will perform various experimental tasks via online survey. It is hypothesized that being in a state of hunger (versus satiety) will cause people to discount the future more (or more strongly desire more imminently available rewards), exhibit higher risk propensity, and act less ethically/more unethically. Fluctuating states of hunger and satiety occur naturally as a result of the myriad physiological, environmental, and subjective determinants of eating behavior. Because we generally fast overnight and sometimes skip meals, such states are part of our everyday lives. Thus, this study has important practical implications for managerial practice, ranging from managing personal decisions making to managing the decision making of others, including when to schedule meetings and negotiations around meal times considering the mindset most appropriate (e.g., risk seeking versus risk averse) given the outcome of preference.
Placement: University of Houston - Downtown

Codou Samba: Management
Dissertation Chair: Dusya Vera
Dissertation Title: Collective Intuition in Strategic Decision Making: A Research Program, Development and Validation of New Measures, and an Exploratory Study

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Firm outcomes of decisions made by senior managers have been the subjects of intense scrutiny from strategy researchers. Three dominant approaches to strategic decision making pervade this literature: rationality, political behavior, and intuition. Although several commentaries have been written on intuition, little is known about its essence, and its use in and impact for organizations. Nevertheless, managers are increasingly adopting this decision tool as an important and effective alternative or addition to more comprehensive and extensive approaches to strategic decision making.

    Fundamentally, intuitions are nonconscious, holistic and fast associations of information elements that result in affectively charged judgments. While helpful, this definition of intuition is generic, and is thus limited in its function of isolating and substantiating the nature of intuitive decision making. In this work, I define intuition as a multi-construct and multi-level phenomenon and then attempt to answer the following question: “in making strategic decisions, do senior managers use their intuition when they actually should?”

    My dissertation work seeks to extend intuition research in the context of strategic decision making. Specifically, I aim to shed light into the intuitive phenomenon, its use in the context of strategic decision making, and its outcomes. This is an important contribution given that managers and researchers may have bought into intuition hastily and treated it too casually given its complexity. In short, I make several theoretical contributions to the literature: (1) conceptual development of intuition that delineates and define its major constructs; (2) conceptual development of collective intuition; and (3) theoretical development for factors driving the use and effectiveness of collective intuition.

    Measuring intuition has so far been a rather difficult and intimidating task. Definitional issues highlighted in this proposal may have played a role in slowing the progress of intuition research. Sounds measures stem from strong construct definitions, and further contributions of my dissertation rests on the quality of the measures of intuition I use to test my models. Therefore, I propose to develop and validate four new scales that reflect the multi-construct multi-level nature of intuition. Finally, I describe an exploratory study, in which these new scales will be used to test a subset of my hypotheses.
Placement: University of Tennessee

Candace TenBrink: Management
Dissertation Chair: Andrew Szilagyi
Dissertation Title: Turnaround Actions and Performance: Strategies for Underperforming Firms in Growth Industries

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Organizational turnaround has been an important facet of management research for decades. Research indicates that firms can recover from a decline; however findings remain equivocal as to which actions provide the best results. Research has been shaped by an ideology, perhaps owing to its roots in firm failure, that a firm must face a crisis to recognize and react to a performance decline. However, perhaps in part due to the lengthy period given to measure a performance decline and a turnaround period, the results are unclear.

    I attempt to bring added clarity into the field by examining turnaround performance within a condensed timeframe. To minimize the impact of environmental effects, I examine performance declines that range from three quarters to two years rather than the typical three year period. I employed life cycle theory to select an industry stage most likely to produce samples that will have a successful turnaround—growth.

    I examine turnarounds by measuring the association between two predominantly studied turnaround actions-¬-operational and strategic actions--and firm performance. The data indicates that underperforming firms in a growth industry are able to recognize and react to a performance decline within a short timeframe. However, a layoff was the only action that was significantly associated with performance. I did find that firm size was significantly and negatively associated with performance, although size is not an action. The data also indicates that severity of decline is significantly related to turnaround performance in a growth industry.
Placement: University of Houston - Downtown

Doctoral Students on the Job Market

Yashar Atefi: Marketing
Dissertation Chair: Michael Ahearne
Dissertation Title: Leveraging Customer-Sales Force Interaction to Create Future Value for the Firm

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    The salesperson-customer interaction is of paramount importance, not only to the immediate transaction, but also to the prospect of bringing customers back for future purchases. In this dissertation I examine the role of salespeople not only in bringing customers back for repeat purchases, but also in developing other revenue streams such as service from the same customers. In essay 1, a completed paper targeted at Journal of Marketing Research, I examine how using successful customer relationship strategies can spill over among salespeople. I report a unique quasi-experiment in an interesting setting: an upscale apparel retailer which trains its salespeople to adopt B2B account management and relationship-building strategies and apply them to their customers hoping to bring them back to the store. I hypothesize and find that using relationship building strategies spills from the trained to the untrained salespeople mostly in stores with competitive climates and when the trained groups have diverse tenure levels. In the second essay, I investigate whether what happens between salespeople and customers during a sales transaction can affect subsequent service profitability of the customer. Focusing on the automotive industry, I hypothesize that giving customers a good deal can increase their service lifetime value. However I hypothesize that this effect is moderated by the degree of negotiation. I argue that bargaining intensity takes a lot of mental effort and hurts the effect of deal desirability on service profitability. Moreover I hypothesize that a number of factors including customer characteristics (e.g. their target price range, proximity to dealership, etc.), transaction type (lease vs. new car purchase; trade-in vs. normal), and incentive type (whether a cash rebate was involved in the deal) moderate this relationship. Initial results from 4 years of sales and service from a national auto dealership corroborate these hypotheses.

Rambod Dargahi: Marketing
Dissertation Chair: James Hess
Dissertation Title: Feedback in Crowdsourcing

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    Crowdsourcing has become a popular way for companies to solicit new ideas and solutions from external sources. Highlighting the principle of ‘two heads are better than one,’ crowdsourcing facilitates the idea generation process by accessing to a large group of individuals in the form of an open call. Companies should motivate individuals to join the crowdsourcing and encourage them to generate ideas, in order to get at least one or few best solutions. Feedback, as a form of interaction between the company and the crowd, plays an important role to this end. In this dissertation, I assess the effect of feedback on the attractiveness of a crowdsourcing platform relative to other factors such as prize size and contest duration, from the participants' point of view. Moreover, after individuals joined the crowdsourcing platform, I explore how feedback influences their performance and participation. I hypothesize that feedback increases the participation and the willingness to improve the quality of ideas, specially among top performers in crowdsourcing.

Phillip Jolly: Management
Dissertation Chair: James Phillips
Dissertation Title: Implicit Theories of Leader-Follower Relationships

  • Click Here to Read Abstract:

    This dissertation examines employees’ implicit assumptions regarding the nature of relationships within their organizations. A significant body of research has focused on the ways in which relationship quality may affect a range of individual, interpersonal, and organizational outcomes (e.g., leader-member exchange, team-member exchange, perceived organizational support, perceived supervisor support, etc.). However, much of what we currently know is based on a view of relationships as static, measured at a single point in time, and does not take into account relationship partners’ views surrounding the capacity for relationships to change. Drawing on social psychological research focused on close personal relationships, I develop the theoretical foundations for what I call Implicit Theories of Leader-Follower Relationships (ITLFRs).

    I theorize that individuals hold one of two views on the nature of relationships – either that the quality and nature of relationships are fixed (a destiny belief) or that relationships can grow and develop over time (a growth belief). Research findings focused on close personal relationships have demonstrated that individuals’ destiny vs. growth belief can have important implications for their attitudes toward and behaviors in a relationship. For example, individuals holding a destiny belief about romantic relationships are more likely to end a relationship at the first sign of difficulty or challenge than are individuals holding growth beliefs. Applied to organizational relationships, implicit theories of relationships may provide important insights into why and when certain individuals engage in behaviors such as job search, turnover intention, withdrawal, counterproductive work behavior, and actual turnover. After providing the theoretical rationale for the importance of ITLFRs in organizations, the second goal of this dissertation is to develop and validate a scale for measuring the construct.

Conference Participation

Yashar Atefi: Marketing

  • “Training Spillover among Competing Salespeople,” with Michael Ahearne, James Maxham III, 5th Biennial Enhancing Sales Force Productivity Conference, Atlanta, GA, June 2015
  • “Training Spillover among Competing Salespeople,” with Michael Ahearne, James Maxham III, Todd Donavan, and Brad Carlson, AMA Winter 2015 – Sales and CRM Track, San Antonio, TX, February 2015.
    • Best Paper Award, CRM and Sales Track
  • “Cross-Selling Behavior of the Sales Force: The Effect of Salesperson-Owned Loyalty,” with Michael Ahearne and Niladri Syam, INFORMS Marketing Science Conference, Boston, MA, June 2012.
  • “Housing Affordability: A Study of Real Estate Market in Iran,” with Farzad Minoei and Rambod Dargahi, 2010 International System Dynamics Conference, Seoul, South Korea, July, 2010.

Raghuram Bommaraju: Marketing

  • Winter AMA, 2015 at San Antonio, "The Impact of Wall Street’s Expectations on Firms’ Management of Key Account Customers," Michael Ahearne, Jeffrey Boichuk, Raghuram Bommaraju, Thomas Steenburgh
  • Enhancing Sales Productivity Conference, 2015 at Atlanta
  • "A Clash of Images: The Impact of Mergers and Acquisitions on the Sales Force," Raghuram Bommaraju, Michael Ahearne, Seshadri Tirunillai, and Zach Hall

Mahdi Ebrahimi: Marketing

  • Ebrahimi, Mahdi, Vanessa Patrick and Melanie Rudd (2014), "Lay Theories of Time," working paper session, Association for Consumer Research Conference, Baltimore, Maryland.

Rambod Dargahi: Marketing

  • Marketing Science Conference - “The Attractiveness of an Idea Contest” (Baltimore, MD, June 2015)
  • Marketing Science Conference - “Feedback in Crowdsourcing: Effect of Motivational Feedback on Idea Quality” (Atlanta, GA, June 2014)

Management

  • Academy of Management Annual Conference, 2015. Jolly, P., & Krylova, K. An investigation of harassment and bullying, identity threat, and turnover intentions.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. Kim, K. Y., Patel, P. & Messersmith, J. Complements or substitutes? Exploring the relationship between vertical pay dispersion and HPWS.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. Maldonado, T., Vera, D.M. & Keller, R.T. Reconsidering absorptive capacity: A meta-Analysis to improve theoretical foundations and measures.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. McKee, R. A., Lee, Y. T., Antonakis, J. Effects of personality and gender on self-other agreement in ratings of transformational leadership.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. Salaiz, A. Is corporate social performance a balancing act? The impact of CSR and CSiR on firm reputation.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. Samba, C., and Miller, C.C. Collective intuition: Toward a theory of intuition in strategic decision making.
  • Academy of Management Conference, 2015. Yu, J. & Atwater, L. Leaders' exchange relationships and member creativity: Both motivation and information matter.
  • Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Conference, 2015. Clark, L. E., Eisenberger, R., Kim, K. Y., & Kirkland, J. E. Perceived supervisor competence and leader-member exchange.
  • Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Conference, 2015. Joo, M. K., & Witt, L. A. Effects of abusive supervision on emotional exhaustion and production deviance.
  • Southern Management Association Conference, 2015. Kim, K. Y., Atwater, L., Kim, M., & Jolly, P. M. Predicting career advancement: The roles of gender, self-efficacy and human capital investment strategies.
  • Southern Management Association Conference, 2015. Kim, K. Y., Jolly, P. M., Kim, M., Atwater, L., & Baik, K. B. 2015. Can leaders influence relationships among team members? The role of supportive leadership.
  • Southern Management Association Conference, 2015. Salaiz, A. Effects of CSiR on firm outcomes: A meta-analysis.
  • Southern Management Association Conference, 2015. Tawse, A., Patrick, V.M., & Vera, D. Planning = cake, doing = fruit salad: A hedonic model of strategy implementation.
  • Southwestern Business Administration Teaching Conference, 2014. Latheef, Z., Jolly, P. M., Samba, C., & Krylova, K. What I wish I knew before I started teaching.
  • Strategic Management Conference, 2015. Ballard K., Vera D., and Pathak, S. Directors' professional devaluation from firm bankruptcy: An integrated model of the effects of stigma, devaluated competence, and gained experience.
  • Western Academy of Management Annual Meeting, 2015. Ross, J., & Jolly, P. M. Developmental training and perceived organizational support: The mediating role of means efficacy.
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Call for Nominations for Doctoral Excellence Awards Ends July 17
News

New grants supporting research and travel have been announced. Learn more in the new section under "Financial Support" on the Accepted Students page of the website. Deadlines are Jan. 9, 2017 and Feb. 1, 2017 and April 5, 2017.


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Professor Rex Du,
Director of Doctoral Programs

 

Professor Volkan Muslu,
Accounting Program Coordinator

Professor Kris Jacobs,
Finance Program Coordinator

Professor Richard DeFrank,
Management Program Coordinator

Professor Randolph Cooper,
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Professor Ye Hu,
Marketing Program Coordinator

Professor Funda Sahin,
Supply Chain Management Program Coordinator


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